A client recently asked me to confirm when a joint venture must be licensed to bid and perform construction work. I explained that the answer depends on the name of the joint venture, where the work will be performed, and – depending on the state in which work is to be performed – the stage of construction.

Both Washington and Oregon generally require contractors to be registered or licensed to perform construction work in their respective states. RCW 18.27.020 requires every contractor to be registered with Washington’s Department of Labor and Industries to advertise, offer, bid, or perform any construction services in Washington. Similarly, ORS 701.021 requires every contractor to be licensed with Oregon’s Construction Contractor’s Board to offer, bid, or perform any construction services in Oregon.

In Washington, RCW 18.27.065 further provides: Continue Reading Joint Ventures and Contractor Licensing Requirements in Oregon and Washington

Since Adam and Eve were evicted from the Garden of Eden, people have been lashing wood together for shelter. As any watcher of numerous survivor shows will tell you, a shelter is only as good as its ability to keep out the water. And, when a shelter gets wet, it needs to be dried out or mold will grow. For contractors in the Pacific Northwest, this is nothing new.

Enter the father and son team of Andrew R. and Robert A. Weisenberger. In October 2013, the U.S. Patent Office granted the Weisenbergers Patent No. 8,567,688 entitledMoisture Reduction and Mold and Moisture Preventative System and Method in Construction.” The Weisenbergers’ patented the process of drying out a home that appears as obvious as boiling a pot of water to cook pasta. The Weisenbergers’ patent consists of the following steps: Continue Reading You Patented What? A Troll on Your Job Site

Construction lien law is critical to understand, because it impacts a contractor’s ability to secure payment and it differs from state to state.  Contractors, however, can avoid many of these issues by being informed and prepared. Some of the most common issues in Oregon involve licensing, lienability, notice and documentation.

Licensing

First, a contractor has to be licensed.  Although it may seem straightforward, a contractor’s ability to get paid depends on valid licensing. Contractors must be validly licensed by the Construction Contractors Board (“CCB”) in order to bring a construction lien claim, file a complaint with the CCB, or commence any other action for compensation for work performed. ORS 701.131(1).

Continue Reading Lien Rights at Risk: An Oregon Guide