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Kelly Corcoran is an insurance coverage attorney focused on resolving complex insurance coverage disputes on behalf of individual and corporate policyholders in their pursuit to recover claims. He has significant experience in handling construction defect coverage issues involving commercial and residential buildings including apartment complexes, condominiums, and single-family homes, as well as other coverage issues involving personal injury and property damage claims.

Recently, a federal district court in Florida held that the Chapter 558 process is not a “suit” under a commercial general liability policy and the insurer had no obligation to defend the insured during this process. Under Chapter 558 of the Florida Statutes, before a lawsuit can be commenced concerning construction defects, the claimant must provide notice of the claim to the contractor and provide the contractor with an opportunity to resolve the claim (often referred to as the “558 process”).

This process can be expensive as it may require the hiring of counsel and experts and entail property inspections. Normally, a contractor will send the 558 Notice to its insurer and request the insurer hire counsel to protect the contractor’s interests. In most cases, the insurers will abide. Unfortunately for one contractor, its insurer denied to do so.

In Altman Contractors, Inc. v. Crum & Forster Specialty Insurance Company, Altman Contractors, Inc. (“Altman”) was served with a Chapter 558 Notice of Claim regarding the construction of a high-rise residential condominium. Altman forward the Notice to its insurer, Crum & Forster, and demanded that Crum & Forster defend and indemnify Altman during the process. Crum & Forster denied that it had a duty to defend Altman because the matter was not in “suit.” Altman filed suit against Crum & Forster for breach of contract as well as for a declaration determining whether Crum & Forster owed Altman a duty to defend the 558 process. Both Altman and Crum & Forster filed motions for summary judgment on these issues.
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Can three days make a difference when filing a construction defect lawsuit? Absolutely! In Cypress Fairway Condominium v. Bergeron Construction Co. Inc., three days was the difference between the claim being time barred and timely filed.

Under Section 95.11(3)(c), Florida Statutes, an action founded on the design, planning, construction, or an improvement to real property must be commenced within ten years after the latest of four specific events: actual possession by the owner, the date of the issuance of a certificate of occupancy, the date of abandonment of construction if not completed, or the date of completion or termination of the contract.
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Please check out my latest post on the Policyholder Report blog regarding a recent Florida decision  – another win for policyholders.  Here is an excerpt:

Last week, a federal district court in Florida reaffirmed the black-letter law in Florida that claims against a general contractor for damage to the completed project resulting from the defective