In the previous blog update (Part 1), I promised to continue decoding densely worded End User License Agreements (EULA). As discussed in the prior blog, the EULA is the agreement containing the terms the user of a software program agrees to abide by in using the software. In this blog, I address security. First, an excerpt from a standard form cloud services agreement:

“Company X shall notify Customer of any Unauthorized Access as soon as reasonably practical. In the event that any applicable law requires that any notice be given to Customer’s Service Users or clients, Company X acknowledges and agrees that Customer shall have control over the timing, content, and method of any required notification.”

Many companies
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Software has become an integral part of the construction world and its use is only growing. There are hundreds of software providers for project management systems, estimating, schedule tracking, BIM, accounting, project portal, dropbox, cloud service providers, the list goes on and on.

Typically, users of software are handed a lengthy agreement and asked to click their consent to the terms. We have all seen this type of agreement; anyone with a cell phone has likely absentmindedly agreed, with a click, to each software update. The writing is small.  The lines are spaced close together.  It goes on for page, after page, after page. The only distinguishing feature is occasionally the words are in all CAPS which feels bad-mannered and impolite.  Frankly, the first paragraph, if one gets that far, is enough to cure all insomniac tendencies one may have in a matter of seconds. These agreements are typically called End User License Agreements (EULA) and are the terms the user of a software program agrees to abide by in using the software.

There is a lot of important information hidden in all that small writing, such as: where a dispute is litigated (not always your home state); non-assignment without consent (i.e. if the software division or your company is purchased by another, you are required to update the terms of the agreement); indemnification; payment terms; termination; confidential information; etc.  That said, I believe there are the big four to be aware of:  1) scope of license; 2) support, aka updates/modifications; 3) security; and 4) limitation of liability.  This article and the three to follow will expand on these four concepts.  First, understanding the scope of your license and usage rights.

PART 1 – SCOPE OF LICENSE

Licenses come in all shapes and sizes.  The license can…
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On April 3, 2018, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed into law HB 4144, which eases licensing requirements for construction contractors, especially those in rural areas. Under the new Construction Contractors Board rules, an individual with at least eight years of experience in the construction industry may apply for a new residential contractor’s license without having

A client recently asked me to confirm when a joint venture must be licensed to bid and perform construction work. I explained that the answer depends on the name of the joint venture, where the work will be performed, and – depending on the state in which work is to be performed – the stage of construction.

Both Washington and Oregon generally require contractors to be registered or licensed to perform construction work in their respective states. RCW 18.27.020 requires every contractor to be registered with Washington’s Department of Labor and Industries to advertise, offer, bid, or perform any construction services in Washington. Similarly, ORS 701.021 requires every contractor to be licensed with Oregon’s Construction Contractor’s Board to offer, bid, or perform any construction services in Oregon.

In Washington, RCW 18.27.065 further provides:
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Since Adam and Eve were evicted from the Garden of Eden, people have been lashing wood together for shelter. As any watcher of numerous survivor shows will tell you, a shelter is only as good as its ability to keep out the water. And, when a shelter gets wet, it needs to be dried out or mold will grow. For contractors in the Pacific Northwest, this is nothing new.

Enter the father and son team of Andrew R. and Robert A. Weisenberger. In October 2013, the U.S. Patent Office granted the Weisenbergers Patent No. 8,567,688 entitledMoisture Reduction and Mold and Moisture Preventative System and Method in Construction.” The Weisenbergers’ patented the process of drying out a home that appears as obvious as boiling a pot of water to cook pasta. The Weisenbergers’ patent consists of the following steps:
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Construction lien law is critical to understand, because it impacts a contractor’s ability to secure payment and it differs from state to state.  Contractors, however, can avoid many of these issues by being informed and prepared. Some of the most common issues in Oregon involve licensing, lienability, notice and documentation.

Licensing

First, a contractor has to be licensed.  Although it may seem straightforward, a contractor’s ability to get paid depends on valid licensing. Contractors must be validly licensed by the Construction Contractors Board (“CCB”) in order to bring a construction lien claim, file a complaint with the CCB, or commence any other action for compensation for work performed. ORS 701.131(1).


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